Republic of Equals: a year of reviews

With the anniversary of publication coming up (November 6th) there are currently five reviews of the book (in reverse chronological order):

John Wilesmith in Economics and Philosophy:

“I consider Thomas’s book to be required reading for anyone working at the intersection of normative political theory and political economy. It makes valuable contributions to a range of existing debates and also opens up new avenues of research, particularly in the final chapter on globalization. Thomas should be applauded for the sheer ambition of his project. His attempt to synthesize the most plausible normative insights from two leading traditions of political thought into a coherent theory of justice and then develop its institutional implications in close conversation with the social sciences is political theory at its most courageous.”

Paul Raekstad in the European Journal of Political Theory:

“Original and interesting.”

“Ambitious and wide-ranging.”

“An important and challenging work that will set the stage for a great deal of the discussion not only of justice and republicanism, but also of POD, market socialism and broader discussions of alternative economic institutions, to come. It develops an interesting synthesis of republican and Rawlsian liberal ideas, and uses this synthesis to contribute to one of the most important problems of our time, namely the growing inequality and oligarchy and the disastrous effects they are having on our world.”

James Lindley Wilson in Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:

“The level of policy detail, informed by Alan Thomas’s studies of historians, economists, and political scientists, is impressive.”

“Thomas’s book articulates and thoroughly defends several important theses … these theses are of great concern to theorists and justice and to those interested in the goals of egalitarian reform. Given the great breadth of this work, it is hard to imagine a reader who will not find much to learn from Thomas’s remarkably well-informed treatment of these pressing matters.”

Nicholas Vrousalis for The Philosophical Review:

“[A] groundbreaking new book.”

Phil Parvin for Political Theory:

“Thomas’s vision of an egalitarian property-owning democracy is powerful and compelling. In drawing on civic republicanism to highlight both the deficiencies of Rawls’s political liberalism and also the specific challenge to democracy and freedom posed by the rise of the New Inequality, Thomas arguably provides the best hope that liberal democratic states have for ensuring greater justice and also repairing what has broken in our current democratic theory and practice.”

 



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